Dominant 7 Flat 9 Chords – Altered Dominant Chords –

Dear Guitarnerds,

todays episode of my jazz blog is about the altered dominant chords Dominant 7 Flat 9 (b9). A lot of you guys asked me for help using those altered chords in jazz comping. Today I´d like to talk about the dom7(b9) as an example for altered dominant chords in jazz. I hope this exercise will help you to get an idea of the voicings, the sound and -in exercise 1 written down- how to use them in jazz chord progressions.

Feel free to contact me for further questions or either personl & skype lessons to learn more about jazz chords and how to use them.

Thank you and have a lot of fun.

Nico Pitzer

http://www.learn2rock.deinfo@learn2rock.de – 00 49 2309 – 57 26 360

 

Download the Tabs and get started: Dominant 7 Flat 9 Chords

 

Chord Formula: 1, 3, 5, b7, b9 – Using a C7(b9) 1=C, 3=E, 5=G, b7=F, b9=Db

As always, I wrote down some chord voicings. I named them as „primary“ and „secondary“ voicings. Primary vocings are used in the most playing situations while secondary voicings are the special ones.

You´ll also find outside (using the 6th to start with root), inside (using the inner 4 strings with 5th string as the root) and chord/melody voicings (with the 4th-1st string and the 4th string as the root).

The chord function of dominant 7 flat 9 is to substitute the dominant type chords. It´s a very good way to create a lot of tension. Dom7(b9) inversions are related to the diminished chords (can be moved in minor thirds). For more informations please contact me.

In Exercise 1 you can try out some fancy chord progressions using the dom7(b9). I hope this will help you out. Have fun & remeber: Play slow and clear, use a metronom and repeat each sequence as much as you need to get it in your fingers.